Woman in labor forced to travel 40 MILES to give birth after THREE hospitals turned her away

Woman in labor forced to travel 40 miles to give birth after THREE NHS hospitals turned her away ‘because they didn’t have enough midwives’

  • Barbara Job, 25, from Peterborough, had to travel to a hospital in Leicester
  • Peterborough, Hinchingbrooke and Rosie City Hospitals turned her down.
  • She was in ‘incredible pain’ when her husband took her to Leicester Royal Infirmary

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A woman in labor had to travel 40 miles to give birth after three hospitals turned her away because they didn’t have enough midwives.

Barbara Job, 25, from Peterborough had to make the hour-long journey to Leicester on Sunday.

Her delivery plans specified Peterborough City Hospital and she called the unit there after her water broke, her mother-in-law Rica Scott said.

But she and her husband, William, were told there weren’t enough staff to ensure a safe delivery and they should look elsewhere.

The couple received the same response at Hinchingbrooke Hospital in Huntingdon and Rosie Hospital in Cambridge.

Leicester Royal Infirmary eventually accepted Ms Job and the couple had to drive to hospital while she was in “unbelievable pain”, Ms Scott said. She gave birth to a healthy boy there yesterday.

Barbara Job (pictured with husband William), 25, from Peterborough, was forced to travel 40 miles to give birth after three hospitals turned her away because they didn't have enough midwives.

Barbara Job (pictured with husband William), 25, from Peterborough, was forced to travel 40 miles to give birth after three hospitals turned her away because they didn’t have enough midwives.

Her delivery plans specified Peterborough City Hospital and she called the unit there after her water broke, but was told there weren't enough staff to ensure a safe delivery and they should look elsewhere.

Her delivery plans specified Peterborough City Hospital and she called the unit there after her water broke, but was told there weren't enough staff to ensure a safe delivery and they should look elsewhere.

Her delivery plans specified Peterborough City Hospital and she called the unit there after her water broke, but was told there weren’t enough staff to ensure a safe delivery and they should look elsewhere.

Record number of midwives have quit due to job stress

By Shaun Wooller and Victoria Allen for the Daily Mail

The number of midwives is reaching a dangerous level that could put lives at risk, as records show more staff leaving than joining the profession for the first time in a decade.

As record numbers suffer burnout and leave, NHS Digital figures for 2021/22 show almost 300 more staff left midwifery than joined the service, with 3,440 leaving and just 3,144 entering.

Analysis of the data showed a record 551 resignations in 2021 due to a lack of work-life balance.

The latest figures for May show that pregnant women have the equivalent of 21,685 full-time midwives in England, 551 fewer than the previous 12 months.

Midwives working in NHS Trust maternity units typically work 12-hour shifts, but many work longer without additional pay to fill staffing shortages and keep services running.

The Mrs Job saga is an outgrowth of the midwifery workforce crisis currently affecting the NHS.

Nearly 300 more employees left the health service than joined last year, the latest NHS statistics show.

The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) says members are “at the end of their rope” and “physically and emotionally exhausted”.

Mrs. Scott told the BBC: ‘They had to face a very long journey for over an hour with her in incredible pain to get to Leicester hospital where she was admitted.

“I found it very upsetting because it made me feel very spoiled.

‘When I had my kids, you got so much attention back then, whereas now you have to struggle.

“I hope other moms don’t go through this, and that’s why Barbara and William wanted me to speak up.”

Mrs. Job experienced prolonged labor, when labor takes longer than normal due to slow cervical dilation.

Staff at the Leicester Royal Infirmary wanted her to return to Peterborough, where she had planned to give birth.

But when he called the local hospital, they told him to stay where he is, Scott said.

Mrs Job had to call the manager of Peterborough City Hospital in front of the staff of Leicester Royal Infirmary.

The Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Integrated Care System, which represents all Cambridgeshire NHS providers, said: “The safety of parents and babies using our maternity units is a top priority.

“While we appreciate the sensitivity of the moment, it may sometimes be necessary to ask mothers to use alternative maternity units if another unit has reached its current capacity.

‘All patients are assessed for risk before they are transferred to an alternative location.

“Anyone with urgent questions about their pregnancy, please contact your local maternity team who can provide support.”

More than half of maternity units in England have received negative safety ratings, according to the latest reports from the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

Regulators rated 80 of the 193 NHS maternity services as “inadequate” or “needs improvement” in their latest inspections.

Low ratings mean they don’t meet basic safety standards, and some continue to fail years after problems were first identified.

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