Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton goes up for auction in Asia and could fetch up to $25 MILLION

SUE: THE T. REX THAT STARTED IT ALL

The dinosaur bone market heated up after a tyrannosaurus rex nicknamed Sue sold at auction for $8.4 million in 1997. It was the first dinosaur to go on display at Sotheby’s.

Although Sue was purchased by the Chicago-based Field Museum, the high price opened the floodgates for auction and was enough to encourage the public to seek out fossilized remains and sell them for high dollar amounts.

Sue was found on August 12, 1990 on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota that was owned by Maurice Williams.

However, it was discovered by paleontologist Susan Hendrickson, the scientist after whom the specimen is named, and paleontologist Peter Larson.

Larson paid Williams $5,000 to take the T. rex, but Larson began receiving sizeable offers for the T. rex shortly after it was removed from the ground. After hearing this, Williams said he gave scientists permission to search the property, but they didn’t take anything they found.

Federal agents seized Sue in 1992 on the grounds that government permission had not been granted to remove the fossil from federal lands, and a year later, Sue was turned over to Williams, who put her up for auction.

Sue was put up for sale at Sotheby’s art auction in 1997 and nine bidders went toe-to-toe for the dinosaur. And after eight minutes, it was the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago that won.

Dinosaur auctions began when Sue (pictured), a T.rex, sold for $8.4 million.  Although obtained by a museum, the large dollar sign encouraged the public to seek out prehistoric remains and sell them to the highest bidder.

Dinosaur auctions began when Sue (pictured), a T.rex, sold for $8.4 million. Although obtained by a museum, the large dollar sign encouraged the public to seek out prehistoric remains and sell them to the highest bidder.

BIG JOHN: THE MOST EXPENSIVE TRICERATOPS EVER SOLD

Discovered by Walter Stein in 2014 when he was exploring a ranch in Perkins County, South Dakota, this specimen was shipped to an auction house in France where it was purchased for a whopping $7.7 million from an anonymous private collector in the US. USA

The massive skeleton is about 60 percent complete. His skull is 75 percent intact.

Big John is one of more than 100 known triceratops fossils, which is one of the most commonly found in North America. This specimen was also found to have a wound in the frill, the area around the neck, which was likely made by a rival dinosaur’s horn.

Before the auction, Big John was flown to Italy, where study co-investigator Flavio Bacchia of fossil restoration company Zoic prepared the specimen.

Big John’s fate remains unknown.

Big John was found by Walter Stein in 2014 while exploring a ranch in Perkins County, South Dakota.  This specimen was also sent to an auction house in France where it was bought for a whopping $7.7 million from an anonymous private collector in the US No one knows where Big John is to this day.

Big John was found by Walter Stein in 2014 while exploring a ranch in Perkins County, South Dakota.  This specimen was also sent to an auction house in France where it was bought for a whopping $7.7 million from an anonymous private collector in the US No one knows where Big John is to this day.

Big John was found by Walter Stein in 2014 while exploring a ranch in Perkins County, South Dakota. This specimen was also sent to an auction house in France where it was bought for a whopping $7.7 million from an anonymous private collector in the US No one knows where Big John is to this day.

STAN: A RECORD $31.8 MILLION SALE – BEFORE SHOWING UP AGAIN IN THE UAE

Stan, a 70 percent complete skeleton of a T. rex, sold for $31.8 million in line art in November 2020.

Stan was discovered in South Dakota in 1987 and was named after the amateur paleontologist who found the remains, Stan Sacrison.

The remains were initially thought to be from a triceratops, but further analysis in 1992 showed its true identity as T.rex.

The skeleton includes 188 bones, making it about 70 percent complete. However, his skull is the most complete and preserved found to date.

The skeleton disappeared from public view when an anonymous bidder paid the record amount.

Almost two years later it was discovered that Stan traveled from New York to Abu Dhabi, where he resides in a new natural history museum in the United Arab Emirates.

Stan, another T.rex, sold for $3.18 million in 2007. A year and a half later it was discovered that Stan traveled from New York to Abu Dhabi, where he resides in a new natural history museum in the United Arab Emirates. so that everyone can marvel at its wonders.  However, Stan's happy ending is not typical of many dinosaur remains discovered on American soil.

Stan, another T.rex, sold for $3.18 million in 2007. A year and a half later it was discovered that Stan traveled from New York to Abu Dhabi, where he resides in a new natural history museum in the United Arab Emirates. so that everyone can marvel at its wonders.  However, Stan's happy ending is not typical of many dinosaur remains discovered on American soil.

Stan, another T.rex, sold for $3.18 million in 2007. A year and a half later it was discovered that Stan traveled from New York to Abu Dhabi, where he resides in a new natural history museum in the United Arab Emirates. so that everyone can marvel at its wonders. However, Stan’s happy ending is not typical of many dinosaur remains discovered on American soil.

.