Steamship that sent an iceberg warning to the Titanic lies at the bottom of the Irish Sea

The steamship that sent an iceberg warning to the Titanic before it sank has been discovered split in two at the bottom of the Irish Sea.

SS Mesaba transmitted a caution signal to the ship ‘unsinkable’ while crossing the Atlantic on April 15, 1912. This message was received, but never reached the bridge.

Later that night, the famous Titanic collided with an iceberg and plunged almost two and a half miles to the bottom of the ocean on her maiden voyage.

The SS Mesaba continued as a merchant ship for another six years before being torpedoed by a German submarine during World War I in September 1918.

Thought to have been lost to history, but thanks to state-of-the-art sonar technology, the remains of the merchant steamship have been rediscovered.

The technology maps the seabed and can highlight details of structures.

Rediscovered: The steamship that sent an iceberg warning to the Titanic before it sank was found split in two at the bottom of the Irish Sea (pictured)

Rediscovered: The steamship that sent an iceberg warning to the Titanic before it sank was found split in two at the bottom of the Irish Sea (pictured)

The remains of the SS Mesaba were discovered with the help of state-of-the-art sonar technology.

The remains of the SS Mesaba were discovered with the help of state-of-the-art sonar technology.

The remains of the SS Mesaba were discovered with the help of state-of-the-art sonar technology.

The SS Mesaba (pictured) continued as a merchant ship for a further six years after the sinking of the Titanic, before being torpedoed by a German submarine while in convoy in September 1918.

The SS Mesaba (pictured) continued as a merchant ship for a further six years after the sinking of the Titanic, before being torpedoed by a German submarine while in convoy in September 1918.

The SS Mesaba (pictured) continued as a merchant ship for a further six years after the sinking of the Titanic, before being torpedoed by a German submarine while in convoy in September 1918.

The multibeam sonar team helped researchers at Bangor University in North Wales identify the wreck and reveal its final position for the first time 21 miles off the Irish coast.

For marine archaeologists, multibeam sonar has the potential to be as impactful as the use of aerial photography for landscape archaeology.

Experts aboard the Prince Madog survey vessel were able to determine that the wreck had previously been misidentified as another ship, while sonar technology provided them with the details to prove that it was, in fact, the Mesaba.

The steamboat was sunk by the Kriegsmarine submarine U-118 as a convoy of which it was a part was making a return voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia.

A total of 20 lives were lost, including that of the ship’s commander.

The multibeam sonar team helped researchers at Bangor University in North Wales identify the wreck and reveal its final position for the first time 21 miles off the Irish coast.

The multibeam sonar team helped researchers at Bangor University in North Wales identify the wreck and reveal its final position for the first time 21 miles off the Irish coast.

The multibeam sonar team helped researchers at Bangor University in North Wales identify the wreck and reveal its final position for the first time 21 miles off the Irish coast.

Experts aboard the Prince Madog survey vessel were able to determine that the wreck had previously been misidentified as another ship, while sonar technology gave them the details to prove that it was, in fact, the Mesaba.

Experts aboard the Prince Madog survey vessel were able to determine that the wreck had previously been misidentified as another ship, while sonar technology gave them the details to prove that it was, in fact, the Mesaba.

Experts aboard the Prince Madog survey vessel were able to determine that the wreck had previously been misidentified as another ship, while sonar technology gave them the details to prove that it was, in fact, the Mesaba.

SS Mesaba (pictured) was sunk by the Kriegsmarine submarine U-118 while the convoy was on a return voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia.

SS Mesaba (pictured) was sunk by the Kriegsmarine submarine U-118 while the convoy was on a return voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia.

SS Mesaba (pictured) was sunk by the Kriegsmarine submarine U-118 while the convoy was on a return voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia.

The vessel is one of 273 shipwrecks in 7,500 square miles of the Irish Sea that were scanned and checked against the UK Hydrographic Office database.

101 wrecks were thought to be unidentified, but the number of recently identified wrecks was much higher because many, including the SS Mesaba, had been misidentified in the past.

Details of all the wrecks have been published in a new book, Echoes from the Deep, by Dr Innes McCartney of Bangor University, which was written under a Leverhulme Fellowship while at Bournemouth University.

Dr McCartney said: ‘The results of the work described in the book have validated the multidisciplinary technique employed and is a ‘game changer’ for marine archaeology.

The vessel is one of 273 shipwrecks in 7,500 square miles of the Irish Sea that were scanned and checked against the UK Hydrographic Office database.

The vessel is one of 273 shipwrecks in 7,500 square miles of the Irish Sea that were scanned and checked against the UK Hydrographic Office database.

The vessel is one of 273 shipwrecks in 7,500 square miles of the Irish Sea that were scanned and checked against the UK Hydrographic Office database.

The Titanic, called the “unsinkable ship,” sank on April 15, 1912, four days after her maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York.

“Previously, we were able to dive a few sites a year to visually identify wrecks.

“The unique capabilities of the Prince Madog sonar have allowed us to develop a relatively inexpensive means of examining the wreck. We can connect this with historical information without costly physical interaction with each site.

“It should be of key interest to marine scientists, environmental agencies, hydrographers, heritage managers, maritime archaeologists and historians.”

Dr Michael Roberts, who led the sonar surveys at the University’s School of Ocean Sciences, said: “The unique expertise and resources that we have at Bangor University, such as ‘Prince Madog’, allow us to deliver research high-quality scientific research in an extremely cost-effective way. way.

“Identifying shipwrecks like those documented in the publication for historical research and environmental impact studies is just one example of this.

“We have also been examining these shipwreck sites to better understand how objects on the seafloor interact with physical and biological processes, which in turn can help scientists support the development and growth of the marine energy sector.” “.

Binoculars could have saved the Titanic, a lookout tells an official inquiry

David Blair (pictured) was an experienced sailor

David Blair (pictured) was an experienced sailor

David Blair (pictured) was an experienced sailor

During the official US investigation into the sinking, lookout Fred Fleet said he had previously used binoculars, known as goggles, on the RMS Oceanic, another ocean liner.

Senator Smith, chairman of the inquiry, asked Fleet: ‘Suppose you had glasses…could you have seen this black object? [the iceberg] at a greater distance?

Fleet responded, “We might have seen it a little earlier.”

When asked ‘How soon?’ he said, ‘Well, long enough to get out of the way.’

Defending Mr Blair, Mr Aldridge added: “Blair would have been quick to clean up his loose ends before then.”

“In his haste, it crossed his mind to hand over the key, so the fate of the Titanic was vicariously in his hands.

‘But in terms of blame you have to look at the captain, EJ Smith. The ship was going too fast in an ice field for which he had warnings.

He continued: “There was a pair of binoculars on the bridge and a pair for the crow’s nest because Blair had them a few days before.”

“But the failure to provide lookouts could be because Lightoller didn’t know where they were.

I would have found them if I could have opened the locker. So in the end all the watchers had was their own eyes.

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