Skeletons of 76 children who were SACRIFICED 450 years ago found in Peru

The skeletons of 76 children who were SACRIFICED during six different killing events in 450 years are discovered in Peru: five girls sitting head to head in a circle were found in a tomb

  • Skeletons of 76 children killed more than 450 years ago in sacrificial rituals found in Peru
  • Archaeologists found a tomb with five girls sitting head to head in a circle.
  • It is not known why the children were killed, but it is likely that they were gifts to the ancient Chimú gods.

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A gruesome scene of 76 skeletons belonging to children who were sacrificed more than 450 years ago has been discovered in Peru, with a tomb containing five young children sitting head to head in a circle.

The remains were interred in two mounds and all but the five children in one grave were buried with their feet to the east and their heads to the west, which is a pattern that is repeated among the sacrificial burials of the ancient society. Chimu. which is known for appalling practices.

This discovery brings the total to 302 sacrificial children that have been found in the area, all of whom were killed in six different sacrificial events from 1050 to 1500.

The reason why these children were killed is still unknown, but scientists speculate that their lives may have been a gift to the gods.

One grave contained the remains of what experts believe to be five girls.  They stood head to head and their bodies formed a circle.

One grave contained the remains of what experts believe to be five girls. They stood head to head and their bodies formed a circle.

The Chimú were a pre-Inca culture that emerged from the remnants of the Moche culture along the coast of Peru in 900 AD and this civilization was the largest pre-Columbian empire in Peru until the Incas.

This group is widely known for their innovations in agriculture, such as the construction of large irrigation systems, along with their child sacrifices.

The graves were unearthed at the Pampa La Cruz archaeological site, located in the Huanchaco district, Andean reports.

Archaeologists found 25 tombs in Mound I and 51 in Mound II.

The team is conducting further investigations to determine how these children were killed and if there was any other reason than that they were gifts to the Chimú gods.

The other graves were found in two different mounds: Mound I contained 25 graves and 51 were found in Mound II.

The other graves were found in two different mounds: Mound I contained 25 graves and 51 were found in Mound II.

The other graves were found in two different mounds: Mound I contained 25 graves and 51 were found in Mound II.

The graves were unearthed at the Pampa La Cruz archaeological site, located in the Huanchaco district, an area that has produced other mass graves of murdered children.

The graves were unearthed at the Pampa La Cruz archaeological site, located in the Huanchaco district, an area that has produced other mass graves of murdered children.

The graves were unearthed at the Pampa La Cruz archaeological site, located in the Huanchaco district, an area that has produced other mass graves of murdered children.

The team is conducting further investigations to determine how these children were killed and if there was any other reason than that they were gifts to the Chimú gods.

The team is conducting further investigations to determine how these children were killed and if there was any other reason than that they were gifts to the Chimú gods.

The team is conducting further investigations to determine how these children were killed and if there was any other reason than that they were gifts to the Chimú gods.

This region is known for mass graves containing the remains of children, the largest discovered in 2019.

More than 140 boys and girls between the ages of five and 14 were killed in what is believed to be a mass sacrifice to appease the gods of a now-extinct religion.

Many of the children and young animals had their hearts cut out during the grisly ritual.

One analysis dates all the remains to approximately 11450, during the height of the Chimú civilization on Peru’s northern coast.

Study author John Verano, professor of anthropology at Tulane University, said: “This site opens a new chapter on the practice of child sacrifice in the ancient world.

“This archaeological discovery was a surprise to all of us: we had not seen anything like this before, and there was no suggestion from ethnohistoric sources or historical accounts of child or camelid sacrifice on such a scale on the north coast of Peru.

This region is known for mass graves containing the remains of children, the largest discovered in 2019 (pictured).  More than 140 boys and girls between the ages of five and 14 were killed in what is believed to be a mass sacrifice to appease the gods of a now-extinct religion.

This region is known for mass graves containing the remains of children, the largest discovered in 2019 (pictured).  More than 140 boys and girls between the ages of five and 14 were killed in what is believed to be a mass sacrifice to appease the gods of a now-extinct religion.

This region is known for mass graves containing the remains of children, the largest discovered in 2019 (pictured). More than 140 boys and girls between the ages of five and 14 were killed in what is believed to be a mass sacrifice to appease the gods of a now-extinct religion.

“We were fortunate to be able to fully excavate the site and have a multi-disciplinary field and laboratory team to perform the excavation and preliminary analysis of the material.”

The anatomical and genetic evidence, published in the journal PLOS One, says cuts to the boys’ sternums and flames suggested their chests were cut open to remove their hearts.

Professor Prieto said: “Accessing the heart by transection of the sternum is a technique familiar to modern thoracic surgeons and goes by various names.

“The purpose of opening the children’s chests can only be a hypothesis, but the extraction of the heart is a probable motivation.”

WHO WERE THE CHIMU PEOPLE OF ANCIENT PERU?

The Chimú were a pre-Inca culture that emerged from the remnants of the Moche culture along the coast of Peru in 900 AD It was the largest pre-Columbian empire in Peru until the Inca era.

The Chimú people lived in a strip of desert, 20 to 100 miles (30 to 160 km) wide, between the Pacific and the Andes.

The Chimú culture is thought to have emerged in the first half of the 14th century, developing a complex civilization with different levels of social hierarchy.

They built cities and large irrigation systems, according to Britannica.

The culture was dominated by agriculture, although they also became known for their impressive textiles and pottery, now Famous for its black pottery and intricately worked precious metals.

The Chimú are believed to have survived by fishing and worshiped the moon, believing it to be more powerful than the sun.

Archaeologists believe that they practiced ritual sacrifice.

Around 1470 AD C., the Inca ruler Tupac Inca Yupanqui conquered Chimú. Later, the Incas absorbed many of their practices, including political organization, irrigation systems, and road engineering.

However, Yupanqui’s rule was short-lived, as the Spanish conquered the region in 1534 AD.

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