North Korea tests third ballistic missile in a week hours after Kamala Harris left the South

North Korea tests the third ballistic missile in a week, hours after US Vice President Kamala Harris left the south following a visit to the DMZ.

  • Seoul’s military said North Korea fired an unidentified missile into the Sea of ​​Japan
  • This is Pyongyang’s third missile test launch since Sunday.
  • Kamala Harris visited the border between North and South Korea

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North Korea has tested its third ballistic missile in less than a week, just hours after US Vice President Kamala Harris left the south after a visit to the DMZ.

The Seoul military confirmed the launch today, just one day after a similar test was conducted just three days after another.

“North Korea fired an unidentified ballistic missile into the East Sea,” Seoul’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement, referring to the waters better known as the Sea of ​​Japan.

North Korea tested its third ballistic missile in less than a week, just hours after US Vice President Kamala Harris left the south after a visit to the DMZ (file image)

North Korea tested its third ballistic missile in less than a week, just hours after US Vice President Kamala Harris left the south after a visit to the DMZ (file image)

While in South Korea, Harris toured the country's heavily fortified border with the North, which has nuclear weapons.

While in South Korea, Harris toured the country's heavily fortified border with the North, which has nuclear weapons.

While in South Korea, Harris toured the country’s heavily fortified border with the North, which has nuclear weapons.

Japan’s coast guard also confirmed a possible launch of a ballistic missile from North Korea, citing information from the Tokyo Ministry of Defense.

While in South Korea, Harris toured the country’s heavily fortified border with the nuclear-armed North as part of a trip aimed at strengthening the security alliance with Seoul.

Speaking at the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), Harris said the US commitment to South Korea’s defense was “uncompromising,” adding that allies were “aligned” in their response to the growing threat posed by South Korea’s programs. Northern arms.

Washington has about 28,500 troops stationed in South Korea to help protect it from the North, and the allies are holding a large-scale joint naval exercise this week in a show of force.

A man looks at a TV screen showing a news broadcast with archive footage of a North Korean missile test, at a train station in Seoul on September 28.

A man looks at a TV screen showing a news broadcast with archive footage of a North Korean missile test, at a train station in Seoul on September 28.

A man looks at a TV screen showing a news broadcast with archive footage of a North Korean missile test, at a train station in Seoul on September 28.

People watch a television screen showing a news broadcast with archival footage of a missile test on September 25.

People watch a television screen showing a news broadcast with archival footage of a missile test on September 25.

People watch a television screen showing a news broadcast with archival footage of a missile test on September 25.

Pyongyang carried out two launches of banned ballistic missiles in the days before Harris arrived, continuing a record streak of weapons tests this year.

The North fired one short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) on Sunday and two SRBMs on Wednesday, Seoul and Tokyo said.

Under Seoul’s new hardline president Yoon Suk-yeol, Seoul and Washington have pushed for joint military exercises, which they insist are purely defensive.

North Korea sees them as rehearsals for an invasion.

Seoul announced Thursday that it will hold trilateral anti-submarine exercises with Japan and the United States, the first such exercises since 2017.

South Korean officials said this weekend they had detected signs that Pyongyang may be preparing to fire a submarine-launched ballistic missile.

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