New NHS hospitals may need to be built for single patient rooms only

New NHS hospitals could be built without wards, it was claimed today.

Instead, patients can stay in their own rooms, depending on plans being considered by health chiefs.

It would mark a major departure from traditional NHS layouts, which, for decades, have relied on multi-bed wards.

Authorities believe the move would help prevent the spread of viruses such as covid, flu and norovirus within hospitals.

New NHS hospitals could be built without wards under plans to ensure all patients get private rooms

New NHS hospitals could be built without wards under plans to ensure all patients get private rooms

Single rooms make up less than 2 per cent of all available beds in England.

Single rooms make up less than 2 per cent of all available beds in England.

Single rooms make up less than 2 per cent of all available beds in England.

Pictured: Tunbridge Wells Hospital in Kent is believed to be the only health services hospital currently using the single room model for its 400 beds.

Pictured: Tunbridge Wells Hospital in Kent is believed to be the only health service hospital currently using the single room model for its 400 beds.

Pictured: Tunbridge Wells Hospital in Kent is believed to be the only health services hospital currently using the single room model for its 400 beds.

Record 40,000 nurses left the NHS last year

A record number of nurses are leaving the NHS in England, with overwhelmed staff leaving hospital positions for higher-paying retail jobs.

More than 40,000 dropped out of the health service last year, nearly a tenth of the workforce, official data suggests.

Many of those who left were highly-skilled and well-informed and had years of work left. They were quitting in search of a better work-life balance, analysts said.

The Nuffield Trust think-tank, which carried out the analysis, said the findings should act as an “urgent wake-up call” for the government, which has yet to commit to resolving the huge staffing crises plaguing the health service. Health.

Understaffing has been central to record delays in NHS care, ambulance delays and queues at the emergency department.

Meanwhile, health leaders warned today that staff are quitting to work in pubs, restaurants and cafes amid the cost-of-living crisis.

Patients can already pay between £100 and £350 a night to stay in a private room while receiving NHS care, such as after giving birth.

But they represent less than 2 per cent of all available beds in England.

There are currently around 130,000 NHS hospital beds across the country, but only 2,200 single patient rooms, Health Service Journal reports.

Current Health Department rules say hospitals must provide at least half of their beds in single rooms when they renovate or build new sites.

But last year, NHS England and Improvement’s national medical director, Professor Stephen Powis, said all patients should be given private rooms as “default”.

Tunbridge Wells Hospital in Kent is believed to be the only site currently using the single room model for its 400 beds.

Under the Government’s plan to refresh the deteriorating state of the NHS, a further 48 hospitals will be built by 2030.

The £4 billion task includes rebuilding some hospitals and tearing down existing buildings to replace them with state-of-the-art facilities.

The one-room-only idea, which is being discussed by the New Hospitals Program (NHP), could save costs in the long run.

NHS bosses have warned that the current economic crisis could delay current projects, with higher borrowing costs making it more expensive to build new units.

Miriam Deakin, director of policy and strategy at NHS Providers, said The I: ‘The current upside-down state of the financial markets is a concern for trusted leaders.

‘The turbulence is creating headaches for the trusts’ large capital projects, including the affordability of rising construction costs.

‘For the Government’s New Hospitals Program trusts, construction delays also have significant cost implications.’

Torbay and the South Devon Foundation Trust, one of the areas to receive a new hospital, saw the cost of its project rise by a third from £371m to £497m after it went from planning for 70 per cent of single rooms on last year to the total of 100.

Last year, Professor Powis said the rooms offer “privacy and dignity”.

He told MPs from the Health and Social Care Committee: ‘Personally, I feel that coming out of the pandemic, one of the things we need to think about a lot is the number of single beds we have.

‘I think we need to move in our hospitals much more to single rooms as they are the default for privacy and dignity, for infection control and indeed for flow issues.

“That’s something we need to think about a lot as we build the hospitals of the future.”

A study conducted by the National Institute for Health and Care Research in 2015 found that two-thirds of patients clearly preferred to be in private rooms.

But a fifth of patients, particularly men, said they preferred the wards for the safety of being visible to staff.

And most staff said they would want a mix of single rooms and open wards, with some saying single rooms prevented them from properly monitoring patients.

Nigel Edwards, chief executive of the Nuffield Trust, told HSJ: ‘The percentage (of beds in single rooms) should be higher than it is at the moment.

“But it’s not clear if 100 percent is the right number.”

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