Mitch McConnell insists abortion is NOT the main issue in the midterms

Mitch McConnell insists that abortion is NOT the main issue in the midterms, and voters’ priorities are inflation, crime and the influx of immigrants at the southern border, as polls show the vote will go to the edge of the knife

  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell insisted Wednesday that abortion will not be the main issue in the midterm elections.
  • “Well, I think that issue is playing out in different ways in different states,” McConnell said at a news conference on Capitol Hill.
  • McConnell said the three big issues Republicans will be talking about are inflation, crime and open borders when they start the campaign.

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell insisted Wednesday that abortion will not be the main issue in the midterm elections.

“Well, I think that problem is playing out in different ways in different states,” he responded at a news conference of Senate leaders, when asked if he was being “too cavalier” about the impact abortion will have.

‘The three big national problems that we’re going to address here, that people are most concerned about nationally, are the ones I mentioned: inflation, crime and open borders. That’s clearly where we’re going to put the focus,” McConnell continued.

The reporter also noted that the Republican candidates did not appear to have a “clear strategy” on how to tackle the burning issue; some said decisions on termination of pregnancy should be decided at the state level and others said they would support Sen. Lindsey Graham’s 15-week federal ban.

“Regarding the issue you raised, I think each of our candidates may have a different answer, depending on where they are,” McConnell acknowledged.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell insisted Wednesday that abortion will not be the top issue in the midterm elections during a news conference with Senate Republican leaders on Wednesday.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell insisted Wednesday that abortion will not be the top issue in the midterm elections during a news conference with Senate Republican leaders on Wednesday.

An abortion activist in Phoenix, Arizona

An abortion activist in Phoenix, Arizona

March against abortion in Los Angeles

March against abortion in Los Angeles

Abortion rights came into the spotlight in the midterm elections after the Supreme Court issued its Dobbs decision in June, which overturned the landmark 1973 case, Roe v. Wade.

Abortion rights came into the spotlight in the midterm elections after the Supreme Court issued its Dobbs decision in June, which overturned the landmark 1973 case, Roe v. Wade.

With President Joe Biden’s low approval numbers, and historical trends running against the Democrats as his party is in control of the White House, 2022 could have been a blast, but instead the races are very slim. .

On Wednesday, McConnell was also asked if he stood by his earlier comments about the “quality of the candidates.”

In August, the Senate’s top Republican said he believed Republicans were more likely to win control of the House than the Senate.

“Senate races are just different: They’re statewide, the quality of the candidates has a lot to do with the outcome,” he said.

“Right now, we have a 50-50 Senate and a 50-50 country, but I think when all is said and done this fall, we are likely to have an extremely close Senate, either on our side slightly up or on their side. side up”. slightly’, he also predicted at the time. ‘

He made a similar forecast on Wednesday.

“Every election, every year, this year, past years, it’s great to have great candidates,” he said. “We’re in a lot of close races, I think we have a 50-50 chance to win back the Senate.

“It’s going to be very, very close either way, in my opinion,” the Kentucky Republican added.

The latest Politico/Morning Consult poll showed just that.

Republicans cut a 5-point deficit to just 2 points in the last week when voters were asked which party they wanted to control Congress.

Last week, Democrats had a 46 percent to 41 percent lead, now the numbers are 45 percent for Democrats and 43 percent for the Republican Party.

Since Wednesday, FiveThirtyEight said that Democrats are still ahead in the race for control of the Senate, in part because Republicans picked “weak candidates,” but Republicans have potential chances to win.

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