Meet Flippy, Sippy and Chippy – these robots can cook fries, serve drinks and make tortilla chips

Whether it’s creating perfectly cooked fries and burgers or pouring spill-free soda, robot chefs are venturing further into the $296 billion US fast food industry amid a nationwide labor shortage. .

Miso Robotics, a company based in California, built a kitchen robot called Flippy that could cook 300 hamburgers a day and later expanded to make fries with the second version.

In May, fast-casual chain Wing Zone signed an agreement with Miso to install Flippy 2 at all future restaurant locations. Jack in the Box is rolling out that same machine alongside the company’s Sippy bot, which quickly pours, labels and seals drink orders, this year with a goal of entering 10 high-volume locations by 2023.

Whether it's creating perfectly cooked fries and burgers or pouring spill-free soda, robot chefs are venturing further into the $296 billion US fast food industry amid a nationwide labor shortage. .

Whether it’s creating perfectly cooked fries and burgers or pouring spill-free soda, robot chefs are venturing further into the $296 billion US fast food industry amid a nationwide labor shortage. .

Miso Robotics, a company based in California, built a kitchen robot called Flippy that could cook 300 hamburgers a day and later expanded to make fries with the second version.

Miso Robotics, a company based in California, built a kitchen robot called Flippy that could cook 300 hamburgers a day and later expanded to make fries with the second version.

Miso Robotics, a company based in California, built a kitchen robot called Flippy that could cook 300 hamburgers a day and later expanded to make fries with the second version.

Jack in the Box is rolling out that same machine this year with a goal of entering about 10 high-volume locations by 2023.

And Miso has another machine called Chippy that can cook Chipotle’s tortilla chips, which will be integrated into a location of the Mexican restaurant in Southern California this year.

The robots, which have been in development for six years, use a combination of cameras, artificial intelligence and predictable mechanized movements to perform repetitive tasks that service workers may find boring or worse. Flippy, Chippy and Sippy never need breaks and don’t complain about working conditions.

However, restaurants that want Flippy 2 have to pay $3,000 a month to rent the food processor and that adds to the cost of installation.

‘We realized that for a robotic solution to be a real solution for our customers, it had to have a really high return on investment for the customer. Which meant I had to take a significant amount of work off the table,” Miso Robotics CEO Mike Bell told the Washington Post.

Above: The company's Sippy bot, which quickly pours, labels and seals drink orders, in action

Above: The company's Sippy bot, which quickly pours, labels and seals drink orders, in action

Above: The company’s Sippy bot, which quickly pours, labels and seals drink orders, in action

The National Restaurant Association reports that 65 percent of restaurant owners say that finding workers is their number one problem.

The National Restaurant Association reports that 65 percent of restaurant owners say that finding workers is their number one problem.

The National Restaurant Association reports that 65 percent of restaurant owners say that finding workers is their number one problem.

The National Restaurant Association reports that 65 percent of restaurant owners say that finding workers is their number one problem.

Amid the aftermath of the pandemic and ongoing worker protests, the industry is grappling with demands for higher wages and more benefits, a push to unionize and still reeling downtown locations that were decimated by store closures. Covid.

Even without robots being widely deployed in America’s 200,000 fast-food locations, many chains, including McDonald’s, Burger King and Starbucks, already have contactless kiosks or mobile payment options that avoid human interaction.

“With more than 100 new stores in our current development pipeline, our technology roadmap is largely based on strategic partnerships with companies like Miso, a pioneer in the field of food automation,” said David Blooom, COO of Wing Zone, in a statement.

At a Jack in the Box in Chula Vista, California, even with Flippy installed, there were still about two dozen employees working at any given time. And there are times when the machine malfunctions.

When the bot started ‘acting weird, jerking and snagging’ while placing a row of tacos on a special metal tray, a Miso bot support specialist is on hand to help the Jack in the Box worker fix the problem. issue.

“This is an upgrade, not a replacement,” Ali Nemat, Jack’s vice president of operations services, told the Washington Post. ‘Our fry is getting promoted and Flippy is his assistant.’

“This is an upgrade, not a replacement,” Ali Nemat, Jack’s vice president of operations services, told the Washington Post. ‘Our fry is being promoted and Flippy is his assistant’

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