MAIL ON SUNDAY COMMENT: The rules apply to everyone, Suella

We probably care less about the personal shortcomings of politicians than ever before. Cases that might have brought down a minister 30 years ago would today be viewed as invasions of privacy rather than grounds for resignation.

When most of the rules are gone, it’s harder to be a hypocrite.

But one thing is sure to spark real outrage: people in high office trying to circumvent rules the rest of us must obey.

Motorists today are surrounded by a spider web of regulation and supervision.

In fact, this is an area where the police and the courts seem ready and willing to prosecute and punish.

A motorist speeding is much more likely to be caught and prosecuted than a burglar. So it’s no great shock to learn that Tory politician Suella Braverman was caught speeding shortly before she became Home Secretary

As for the Speed ​​Awareness Course itself, those who have taken part in these sessions are usually very glad they went

As for the Speed ​​Awareness Course itself, those who have taken part in these sessions are usually very glad they went

A motorist speeding is much more likely to be caught and prosecuted than a burglar.

So it’s no great shock to learn that Tory politician Suella Braverman was caught speeding shortly before she became Home Secretary.

And, as usual, she was given the choice between points on her driver’s license and taking a Speed ​​Awareness Course.

Ms Braverman, who has since become Home Secretary and is very close to the administration of justice, appears to have sought special treatment, presumably because she was embarrassed by the procedure. This is a pity.

Mrs Braverman has shown herself to be an intelligent and active minister. If she had just done what was necessary, most of us would have shrugged and said, “It could happen to anyone.”

As for the Speed ​​Awareness Course itself, those who have taken part in these sessions are usually very glad they went; safer drivers with a better idea of ​​their limitations and a better understanding of the need for speed limits.

Let’s hope Mrs Braverman – and others – learn from this that the best thing to do in such circumstances is to act like normal people, give in and suffer the consequences.

Killing politicians in movies is a terrible fate

The country and the political world were rightly outraged when beloved MP, wife and mother Jo Cox was murdered in the street.

There was similar dismay when David Amess, a beloved MP, husband and father, was stabbed to death during a constituency operation.

As much as we criticize our politicians, we know that in this free democracy we never go beyond verbal attacks. Serious violence in our politics is a merciful rarity and we should all hope it stays that way.

Writer Hilary Mantel, renowned for her Tudor novels, got into trouble for a short story in which she fantasized about Lady Thatcher's murder

Writer Hilary Mantel, renowned for her Tudor novels, got into trouble for a short story in which she fantasized about Lady Thatcher’s murder

Yet some people seem to think they can turn such crimes into drama or fiction without consequences.

Writer Hilary Mantel, renowned for her Tudor novels, got into trouble for a short story in which she fantasized about Lady Thatcher’s murder.

She described a wealthy woman letting an IRA killer into her flat so he could shoot the prime minister from a window.

As the IRA had indeed tried to kill Lady Thatcher in the Brighton bombing, killing and seriously injuring several others, many did not find the story funny or clever.

And maybe they feel the same way about a new film already doing the rounds at the art festivals called Killing Boris.

The film comes from the taxpayer-subsidized National Film and Television School, which also receives help from the TV and film industry.

Musa Alderson-Clarke, the film’s writer and director, is of course entitled to his take on Boris Johnson and his role in Downing Street’s infamous lockdown parties.

His mother committed suicide during the lockdown. But in the age of Cox and Amess, is he wise or responsible to make a movie where he fantasizes about a man plotting to kill Boris Johnson in an elementary school? Can we ever be sure where such ideas can take root and grow?

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