Football league clubs have been MAKING MONEY from fans game losses

EFL clubs have been MAKING MONEY on their own fans’ game losses through the controversial Sky Bet scheme, which has been branded ‘exploitation’ after being discontinued… but some teams are STILL profiting from it.

  • Football league clubs have been making money on losing bets from fans
  • An affiliate scheme with Sky Bet saw clubs pocket a percentage of losses
  • Scheme discontinued in 2020 but some EFL sides still benefit
  • Some larger championships made £10,000 annually from supporter losses

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Football League clubs have been making money off their supporters’ game losses, it has emerged.

Under an affiliate scheme that has sparked outrage, EFL members pocketed a percentage of supporters’ losses when they placed unsuccessful bets with competition sponsors Sky Bet.

The scheme, which MP Carolyn Harris called exploitative on Wednesday, was suspended at the end of the 2019-20 season, established in 2013 and renewed in 2017.

EFL clubs have been making money off their own fans' game losses with Sky Bet

EFL clubs have been making money off their own fans’ game losses with Sky Bet

However, the EFL admitted that some teams continue to benefit, and will do so until the end of the 2023-24 campaign.

Some of the biggest clubs in the Championship made around £10,000 a year from the deal which saw the clubs act as intermediaries, sending punters to Sky Bet and then collecting a percentage of the money they lost.

Fans were invited to click on links to Sky Bet on club websites and register accounts.

Those accounts were then traced and the club in question collected a portion of the subsequent losses.

Some Championship clubs have been earning up to £10,000 annually through the scheme.

Some Championship clubs have been earning up to £10,000 annually through the scheme.

Some Championship clubs have been earning up to £10,000 annually through the scheme.

It remains to be seen whether Premier League clubs that have or had sponsorship deals with bookmakers were subject to similar incentives.

A draft white paper that was meant to reform gambling laws has been shelved several times and there are concerns that new Prime Minister Liz Truss may abandon it.

Conservative MP Iain Duncan Smith, who is trying to keep the white paper alive, told The Guardian the deal was “terrible”.

“For a football club to benefit from this goes against everything they are supposed to stand for: support for their fans, for the people who go onto the pitch,” he said.

There is concern that Prime Minister Liz Truss may abandon plans to reform gambling laws.

There is concern that Prime Minister Liz Truss may abandon plans to reform gambling laws.

There is concern that Prime Minister Liz Truss may abandon plans to reform gambling laws.

Labor MP Carolyn Harris said there appears to be evidence that clubs are exploiting their own fans.

Labor MP Carolyn Harris said there appears to be evidence that clubs are exploiting their own fans.

Labor MP Carolyn Harris said there appears to be evidence that clubs are exploiting their own fans.

Labor MP Carolyn Harris, who co-chairs a multi-party parliamentary group examining gambling-related harm, added: “This appears to be evidence that football clubs are exploiting their own fans, some of whom will be addicted. to the game, by taking a part”. of every penny they lose to greedy bookmakers.’

An EFL spokesman said: “When the EFL and Sky Bet renewed their long-standing partnership for the 2019/20 season, we put more of a focus on putting safer gaming at the heart of the deal.” As a result, the previous affiliate scheme was discontinued.

“While some clubs receive income from legacy registrations that occurred prior to the new deal, the affiliate scheme in place has been phased out and all registration links through EFL Digital channels have been removed.”

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