Experts warn Indian restaurants could close at rate of ONE-A-DAY as businesses battle soaring prices

Britain’s Indian restaurants are facing a harsh winter as the price of ingredients skyrockets, forcing them to raise the prices of their own menus.

Many curry houses are now closing as fewer customers and rising wholesale costs make doing business increasingly difficult.

One in four curry restaurants has closed since 2007 and the remaining are fighting to survive the cost-of-living crisis, The Mirror reports.

The UK’s 9,000 Indian restaurants are injecting £3.6bn into the economy, but Jeffrey Ali, whose family set up the British Curry Awards, said the industry “desperately needs it” – with high labor and ingredient costs.

Mr Ali told the newspaper that 3,000 restaurants have closed since 2007.

He said, “At the current rate of inflation, we could soon see at least one restaurant a day closing.”

Indian restaurants in Britain face a harsh winter as ingredient prices skyrocket – forcing them to raise the prices of their own menus

Indian restaurants in Britain face a harsh winter as ingredient prices skyrocket – forcing them to raise the prices of their own menus

Many curry houses are now closing as fewer customers and rising wholesale costs make doing business increasingly difficult

Many curry houses are now closing as fewer customers and rising wholesale costs make doing business increasingly difficult

Many curry houses are now closing as fewer customers and rising wholesale costs make doing business increasingly difficult

One in four curry restaurants has closed since 2007 and the remaining are fighting to survive the cost of living crisis

One in four curry restaurants has closed since 2007 and the remaining are fighting to survive the cost of living crisis

One in four curry restaurants has closed since 2007 and the remaining are fighting to survive the cost of living crisis

Of ingredients, onions are now twice as expensive – going from £7 a bag to £14 in the last decade, while cooking oil has risen from £19 for 20 liters in 2012 to £33.

Tighter visa restrictions have also made it difficult for restaurants to hire enough talented chefs with knowledge of Indian cuisine.

Existing pressures on the hospitality industry have been exacerbated by the cost-of-living crisis as consumers cut back to focus on rising energy bills.

Small businesses themselves, many of which have made it through the lockdown, are not protected by energy watchdog Ofgem’s price cap and must pay 20 percent VAT on their gas and electricity, while most ordinary households pay 5 percent.

Salim Chowdhury of award-winning restaurant Coriander in Harrow, north London, says his gas bill has risen from £2,500 a month to £6,900, while his electricity bill has risen from £1,000 to £1,912.

He says wholesale prices have increased by 30 percent, forcing him to increase the prices on his menu by 15 percent, which led to some customers complaining.

The UK's 9,000 Indian restaurants are injecting £3.6bn into the economy, but the industry desperately needs support - with labor and ingredient costs high

The UK's 9,000 Indian restaurants are injecting £3.6bn into the economy, but the industry desperately needs support - with labor and ingredient costs high

The UK’s 9,000 Indian restaurants are injecting £3.6bn into the economy, but the industry desperately needs support – with labor and ingredient costs high

Of ingredients, onions are now twice as expensive - going from £7 a bag to £14 in the last decade, while cooking oil has risen from £19 for 20 liters in 2012 to £33.

Of ingredients, onions are now twice as expensive - going from £7 a bag to £14 in the last decade, while cooking oil has risen from £19 for 20 liters in 2012 to £33.

Of ingredients, onions are now twice as expensive – going from £7 a bag to £14 in the last decade, while cooking oil has risen from £19 for 20 liters in 2012 to £33.

Mr Chowdhury said, ‘It’s not about making money, it’s about surviving. It’s just keeping your head above water.’

Despite injecting £10,000 of his own savings into the company, he said: ‘I don’t know how long I can do that.’

The UK is experiencing the biggest drop in living standards and purchasing power since World War II, with stores offering discounts of up to 70 percent to attract shoppers.

A number of studies show that it will be a sober Christmas of austerity for many families

A series of studies point to a Christmas of austerity where families cut back on spending while struggling to stay warm and put food on the table.

Evidence from the Office for National Statistics shows an increase in people looking for refurbished and second-hand items, including through auction houses.

eBay UK General Manager, Murray Lambell, said: ‘This Black Friday, consumers have taken advantage of Home and Tech refurbished and pre-loved deals to consciously save on popular high-ticket items, including Certified Refurbished Dyson Air Wraps and Air Fryers.’

Electricity bills have doubled from last year this winter, despite a tariff cap introduced by the government to counter the worst effects of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

At the same time, food prices have risen more than 16 percent, driving up the cost of basic necessities, from milk to bread and eggs, as well as turkey

.