Can YOU solve these math questions? Test your brain with these number puzzles from 11+ exam papers

Are you a math whiz – or at least able to solve the same equations as your 10-year-old?

Some parents who excelled at math as students are now stunned when they try to work out the answers to their kids’ math homework.

Adults began sharing maths problems on Twitter this week after Prime Minister Rishi Sunak declared that maths should be compulsory until age 18, a move union leaders warned could lead to more teachers’ strikes.

So as Mr Sunak lays out his vision for Britain, MailOnline asks you… can you solve the kinds of questions your child will answer on their SAT exam?

WHAT ARE THE ANSWERS?

  1. 38
  2. 13
  3. 378
  4. 821
  5. 49 999
  6. 40.5
  7. 2 or 4
  8. 3/5 8/15 11/20
  9. The answer is e. Work out by taking the answer, 14, and reversing the steps described. Subtraction becomes addition (14 + 6 = 20), doubling becomes halving (half of 20 is 10), and you get a starting number of 10.
  10. The answer is b. The chart does not have a bar for ‘zero DVDs’, so you need to calculate this by adding the total number of students shown by adding the bars shown and subtracting this from the total number of students in the class (30) . 3 students have 1-10 DVDs, 4 students have 11-20, 6 have 21-30, 7 have 31-40, 5 have 41-50, 2 have 51-60 and 1 has 71-80 DVDs. Add 3 + 4 + 6 + 7 + 5 + 2 + 1 = 28, which is two less than the total class of the 20 students, so the correct answer is 2.

In his first major speech as Prime Minister yesterday afternoon, Mr Sunak vowed to equip children for the ‘jobs of the future’ by tackling the UK’s high rates of innumerable education.

Young people will be forced to take ‘some form’ of mathematics, either through new courses or existing qualifications such as A Levels, T Levels and Core Maths. For most, the drive is practical skills rather than algebra.

According to government figures, around eight million adults in England have the numeracy skills expected of primary school children.

Currently, only about half of 16- to 19-year-olds are studying math in some form. The problem is particularly acute for disadvantaged students, 60 percent of whom do not have basic math skills by age 16.

But union leaders warn teachers are now more likely to strike after backlash over Mr Sunak’s math pledge.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak (pictured Lats Month) yesterday declared that mathematics should be compulsory up to the age of 18

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak (pictured Lats Month) yesterday declared that mathematics should be compulsory up to the age of 18

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak (pictured Lats Month) yesterday declared that mathematics should be compulsory up to the age of 18

Kevin Courtney, who oversees more than 300,000 educators as co-secretary of the National Education Union (NEU), accused Sunak of a “stunning failure” to notice the obstacles the industry faces.

“Sunak’s plan is disappointing not only for its lack of realism, but also for its lack of vision,” he said.

“It ignores the increasingly detailed and urgent discussions of curriculum reform taking place in the education sector and even within his own party.

“Most people who voted will have voted. But I think there will be some people who will look at this and think ‘is that all they have to say about education?’

“It sounds like they are not taking the problem of the teacher recruitment crisis seriously because they have missed their math teacher recruitment targets every year for the past 11 years.”

Teachers, who are currently voting, say the plan fails to address the recruitment crisis currently gripping the sector.

More than 500,000 teachers across three unions are considering possible strike action in England and Wales, with deadlines for voting from January 9.

Unions have urged staff to vote as soon as possible, fearing postal chaos could delay the return of ballots.

More than 500,000 teachers across three unions consider possible strike action in England and Wales, with deadlines for voting from January 9

More than 500,000 teachers across three unions consider possible strike action in England and Wales, with deadlines for voting from January 9

More than 500,000 teachers across three unions consider possible strike action in England and Wales, with deadlines for voting from January 9

Meanwhile, opposition parties have dismissed the initiative as ’empty’ – while the Tories urged Sunak to focus instead on tackling illegal immigration.

Shadow education secretary Bridget Phillipson said the prime minister “needs to show his work” because “he can’t deliver on this heated, empty promise without more maths teachers.”

She added: ‘Yet year after year the government has failed to meet its target for new maths teachers, with existing teachers leaving en masse.’

A Labor source said: ‘In their desperation to ensure that Sunak’s speech does not take place after Keir’s, Number 10 have revealed that they have nothing to offer the country except… double math.

“As health care disintegrates after 12 years of Tory rule, criminals terrorize the streets and working people worry about their pay that month, the country has a right to ask: Is this it?”

Former cabinet minister John Redwood tweeted: ‘As the prime minister turns his attention to maths education, he should not forget his choice as the top priority was to stop illegal migration.

“Parliament urgently needs to legislate on small boats and public services.”

Nigel Farage also waddled in and said, ‘So Rishi Sunak’s big idea to save the nation is maths up to the age of 18! How will quadratic equations help to solve broken Britain?’

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